Neotame Side Effects

Neotame E961 appears as a white crystalline powder that serves as an artificial sweetener that is between 7,000-13,000 times sweeter than table sugar. This product is moderately heat stable and extremely potent. Neotame E961 is used in canned fruit, jellies, soft drinks chewing gum, and as table top sweeteners. Though it’s considered safe, some are convinced it has potentially dangerous health effects.

What Is Neotame E961?

Neotame E961 is a white powdered no-calorie sweetener, which is a derivative of the dipeptide composed of the amino acids, aspartic acid and phenylalanine. The components of neotame are joined together to form a uniquely sweet ingredient. The FDA approved the use of neotame as a general purpose sweetener in July 2002.  Neotame E961 is used in the application of canned fruit, jellies, soft drinks, bakery food, and chewing gum.

Possible Side Effects of Neotame E961

Neotame is generally considered a safe ingredient. Possible long-term side effects

  • brain damage
  • bodily tissue damage

medicine)

GRAS Affirmation: Yes

Generally recognized as safe (GRAS) is an American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) designation that a chemical or substance added to food is considered safe by experts, and so is exempted from the usual Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) food additive tolerance requirements. Neotame E961 is considered safe by FDA.

Suggested Dosage

NA.

Special Populations Precaution

There is a lot of concern about diet and nutrition for these population, like Newborns, children, pregnant, sensitive to Neotame E961 populations. Better consult to your doctor if you would like to intake Neotame.

 

 

 

Related Research

1. Determination of neotame in beverages, cakes and preserved fruits by column-switching high-performance liquid chromatography. [Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2010 Sep] Author: Yang D, Chen B.

2. Long-term food consumption and body weight changes in neotame safety studies are consistent with the allometric relationship observed for other sweeteners and during dietary restrictions. [Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2003 Oct] Author: Flamm WG, Blackburn GL, Comer CP, Mayhew DA, Stargel WW.

Post Tags -