Sodium Diacetate Side Effects

(Last Updated On: November 15, 2017)

Sodium Diacetate is a white crystalline powder used as a preservative, anti-fungus agent chelating agent, flavoring agent and PH regulator. Sodium Diacetate is used in cookies, condiments, red meat, poultry, sauces and chips. Though it’s considered safe, some are convinced it has potentially dangerous health effects.

What Is Sodium Diacetate?

Sodium Diacetate is a free flowing acidic sodium salt widely used as food flavoring, preservative, and pH buffer. As a food flavoring agent, sodium diacetate is most often used to impart a vinegar flavor in snacks, breads, and soups. As a preservative, it can effective in preventing the development of several mold strains and is also used as an antibacterial agent to prolong the shelf life of many food types. Recent studies also suggest that sodium diacetate is an effective microbial inhibitor and pH regulator in meat and poultry products.

Possible Side Effects of Sodium Diacetate

Although Sodium Diacetate generally regarded as a safe and effective supplement, there can be some minor side effects. Possible side effects: Burning; dry skin; flushing; irritation; itching; rash; stinging.

GRAS Affirmation: Yes

Generally recognized as safe (GRAS) is an American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) designation that a chemical or substance added to food is considered safe by experts, and so is exempted from the usual Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) food additive tolerance requirements. Sodium Diacetate is considered safe by FDA.

Suggested Dosage

NA.

Special Populations Precaution

There is a lot of concern about diet and nutrition for these population, like Newborns, children, pregnant, sensitive to Sodium Diacetate populations. Better consult to your doctor if you would like to intake Sodium Diacetate.

 

 

 

Related Research

1. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes growth in cured ready-to-eat meat products by use of sodium benzoate and sodium diacetate. [J Food Prot. 2008 Jul] Author: Seman DL, Quickert SC, Borger AC, Meyer JD.

2. Protein variations in Listeria monocytogenes exposed to sodium lactate, sodium diacetate, and their combination. [J Food Prot. 2007 Jan] Author: Mbandi E, Phinney BS, Whitten D, Shelef LA.

3. Predictive model for the combined effect of temperature, sodium lactate, and sodium diacetate on the heat resistance of Listeria monocytogenes in beef. [J Food Prot. 2003 May] Author: Juneja VK.