Vitamin A Side Effects

VITAMIN A, CAS# 79-81-2, is a type of vitamin manufactured through chemical synthesis, available as light yellow to yellow waxy solid. Vitamin A is widely used as nutrition supplements. It is widely accepted as safe food additive in many countries.

General Side Effects

Long-term use of large amounts of vitamin A might cause serious side effects including fatigue, irritability, mental changes, anorexia, stomach discomfort, nausea, vomiting, mild fever, excessive sweating, and many other side effects.

Suggested Dosage

As Vitamin A is widely known as safe, there is no limit on dosage of intake. However, we still recommend consumers to consult professionals before using large quantity of Vitamin A for long period.
* ADI: Acceptable Daily Intake
* MTDI: maximum tolerable daily intake
* Data source: JECFA Database of WHO

Special Groups Precaution

Special groups refer to newborns, children, pregnant and any other applicable vulnerable groups.
Vitamin A may have some affect on infant, children under 4 and pregnant. We recommend consumers to consult professionals before using Vitamin A in food of infant, children under 4 and pregnant.

GRAS Affirmation: Yes

Generally recognized as safe(GRAS) is a FDA designation that a specific substance or ingredient is generally considered safe by experts, and so is exempted from the usual Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) food additive tolerance requirements. Vitamin A is considered safe by FDA according to existing data and granted GRAS status.

VITAMIN A in News

No breaking news or public health crises reported about Vitamin A reported up to now.

Related Research

1. What is the safe dose of vitamin A in children with measles? [Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Apr;] Author: Buyukavci M, Tan H, Keskin Z, Doneray H.

2. Regular vitamin A supplements are safe for pregnant women who consume few liver products. [Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1996 Mar 23] Author: Cornel MC, de Walle HE, de Jong-van den Berg LT.

3. Regular vitamin A supplements are safe for pregnant women who consume few liver products. [Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1996 Jan 27] Author: van den Berg H, Hulshof KF, Deslypere JP.